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March-19-2014

By Mackenzie Mays  
The Charleston Gazette  

The state's only school for deaf and blind students is still looking for a source of funding to make improvements to its outdated facilities.

The West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind's current facilities, which were built in 1938, do not meet federal and state standards and pose safety risks to students, but finding an entity to pay for a campus overhaul isn't easy, school superintendent Lynn Boyer said.

Boyer...

March-18-2014

By Mackenzie Mays 
The Charleston Gazette

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- School districts across the state asked the West Virginia School Building Authority for funding for various projects Monday.

The SBA's spring meeting will continue today with Kanawha County Schools, the state's largest district, asking for more than $2 million to add on to Andrews Heights Elementary, where some students are housed in portable classrooms.

A total of 19 counties plan to ask for funding,...

March-18-2014

By Shauna Johnson 
WV MetroNews

It’s a reserve account designated for emergencies, but there’s still disagreement at the State House about whether West Virginia’s current financial situation is the kind of catastrophe meriting a $120 million dip into the Rainy Day Fund.

“I’m very glad that we had a savings account where we didn’t have to cut services for children or seniors or whatever the case may be to get us over this little bump in the road,” said House Majority Whip...

March-18-2014

By Ryan Quinn 
The Charleston Gazette

WINFIELD, W.Va. -- The Putnam County Board of Education is asking for public input on the 2014-15 school calendar, but Superintendent Chuck Hatfield said Monday the board's options are greatly constrained by state regulations, including new ones going into effect.

The new rules, instituted by Senate Bill 359, didn't affect this school year. The county schools are now mandated to have all 180 instructional days, said Cindy Daniel,...

March-17-2014

Bluefield Daily Telegraph (editorial)

In the past, learning how to write in cursive was an important part of every American child’s education. Skill with a pen was an essential part of being able to communicate. Many letters and everyday documents such as property records and wills were written in cursive.

The importance assigned to cursive writing changed as communications technology changed. Typewriters gave people the ability to draft letters and documents in print. This...

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