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July-21-2015

Martirano: Next year's testing may be moved back
By WV MetroNews Staff

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — State School Superintendent Dr. Michael Martirano says he plans to work with interested parties in the coming months to change the time of standardized testing next school year.

“The misnomer is that once testing occurs, that instruction ends,” Martirano said last week on MetroNews Talkline. “So we’re looking to push that testing window back. I’ll be working with...

July-21-2015

Campaign aims to double low income students' proficiency rates
By Ryan Quinn, The Charleston Gazette-Mail

Of the 60 percent of West Virginia students who come from low-income backgrounds, only a third can read proficiently by the end of third grade.

That’s according to Charlotte Webb, coordinator of elementary education for the state Department of Education and state leader for the West Virginia Leaders of Literacy: Campaign for Grade-Level Reading, a...

July-17-2015

Manchin, Capito vote to rewrite decades-old education law
By Sam Speciale, The Charleston Daily Mail

U.S. Sens. Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito voted Thursday to overhaul a decades-old education law that promises to roll back federal oversight of schools and shift more control to states and local-level educators.

Manchin and Capito applauded the bipartisan effort to pass the Every Child Achieves Act, which serves as a rewrite of the outdated and now-...

July-16-2015

Martirano takes questions on Common Core during “Talkline” appearance
By Jeff Jenkins in News | July 16, 2015 at 1:40PM

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — State School Superintendent Dr. Michael Martirano took calls from across the state Thursday on MetroNews “Talkline.” Martirano addressed the Common Core (Next Generation) teaching standards that have caused lots of debate in West Virginia.

Martirano spent time explaining Common Core.

“It’s a set of standards in...

July-16-2015

State improves pension rankings
By Samuel Speciale, Capitol reporter, Charleston Daily Mail

The country’s public employee pension funding shortfall is set to eclipse $1 trillion, according to new research from the Pew Charitable Trust, but the study has found that states like West Virginia have made significant moves since the 2008 recession to close that gap.

According to the report, released Tuesday and presented to state retirement officials on...

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