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October-27-2015

Martirano says Fayette schools some of the 'worst he's seen'
By Alex Wiederspiel, WV MetroNews

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Dr. Michael Martirano, State Superintendent of Schools in West Virginia, said the conditions of the Fayette County schools are among the worst he’s ever seen in his time as an educator.

He also said the Fayette County school facilities are the worst he’s seen in the Mountain State.

“The top concern is in Fayette County,” Martirano said...

October-26-2015

Study: Kids take 100-plus required tests through 12th grade
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - Students, parents and teachers have long lamented the hours that kids spend taking standardized tests, especially since the introduction of the Common Core academic standards. But just how much time each year is it?

A. Between 10-15 hours.

B. Between 20-25 hours.

C. Between 30-35 hours.

The correct answer is "B," according to a...

October-26-2015

WV tax committee hears all sides, must weigh options
By Linda Harris, Legal Reporter, The State Journal

West Virginia’s Joint Select Committee on Tax Reform heard from special interests and the public Oct. 20. Those who spoke want to make sure any changes the Legislature ultimately makes grow revenues without hurting the constituencies and causes they hold dear.

 But those causes and constituencies run the gamut from children, young adults, seniors, low-...

October-26-2015

Q and A: What will Obama's new testing plan mean for students, teachers?
By PBS Newshour

WILLIAM BRANGHAM: President Obama and the federal Department of Education are calling on states to cut back on standardized tests in schools. U.S. school kids from pre-K through 12th grade, on average, take eight standardized tests every year. That’s almost one test a month during the school year.

In a Facebook video yesterday, the president said teachers have told...

October-26-2015

Obama administration calls for limits on testing in schools
By Kate Zernike, The New York Times

Faced with mounting and bipartisan opposition to increased and often high-stakes testing in the nation’s public schools, the Obama administration declared Saturday that the push had gone too far, acknowledged its own role in the proliferation of tests, and urged schools to step back and make exams less onerous and more purposeful.

Specifically, the...

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